$BLUE

Bluebird bio Inc

  • NASDAQ
  • Health Technology
  • Biotechnology
  • Manufacturing
  • Biological Product (except Diagnostic) Manufacturing

PRICE

$3.3 β–²0.61%

Extented Hours

VOLUME

2,301,302

DAY RANGE

2.98 - 3.29

52 WEEK

2.89 - 23.28

Join Discuss about BLUE with like-minded investors

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@mat #FOREX
12 minutes ago

mn blue is 19,4- ... waiting

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TR
@trademaster #TradeHouses
2 hours ago

By Andrew Galbraith SHANGHAI (Reuters) - Asian share markets slipped on Thursday on persistent concerns over growth in China and worries about the Federal Reserve's intent to tighten policy quickly, confirmed in minutes of the early May rate-setting meeting released overnight. While Wall Street closed higher after the minutes, which showed a majority of Fed policymakers backed half-percentage-point rate hikes in June and July along with a unanimous view the economy was strong, the mood was subdued in Asia. MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan was down 0.6%, taking losses for the month to 5%. Australian shares were down 0.47%, while Japan's Nikkei stock index slid 0.17%. In early European trading, the pan-region Euro Stoxx 50 futures were down 0.14%, as were German DAX futures. "It's very difficult for investors to navigate this market at the moment with high inflation, slower growth, rising interest rates and concerns about the Chinese (COVID-19) predicament, but also stagflation is looming as a potential issue at the same time," said Ryan Felsman, a senior economist at fund manager CommSec. The falls in Asia contrasted with a more upbeat mood on Wall Street, where the Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 0.6%, the S&P 500 gained 0.95% and the Nasdaq Composite added 1.51%. [.N] All participants at the Fed's May 3-4 meeting supported a half-percentage-point rate increase - the first of that size in more than 20 years - and "most participants" judged that further hikes of that magnitude would "likely be appropriate" at the Fed's policy meetings in June and July, according to minutes from the meeting While some investors worry that overly aggressive interest rate hikes by the Fed could tip the economy into recession, Wednesday's minutes seemed to suggest the Fed would pause its tightening streak to assess the impact on growth. The immediate attention is on Thursday's Commerce Department release of its second take on first-quarter GDP, which analysts expect to show a slightly shallower contraction than the 1.4% quarterly annualised drop originally reported. "The Fed will be crossing their fingers for Q1 GDP to be upwardly revised today, because another print of -1.4% or worse could exacerbate concerns of stagflation," Matt Simpson, senior market analyst at broker City Index, wrote. Elsewhere in Asia, South Korea's central bank raised interest rates for a second consecutive meeting as it grapples with consumer inflation at 13-year highs. Chinese blue-chips fell initially, but recovered as the day progressed after a drop in daily COVID-19 cases in the country, where lockdowns aimed at curbing the spread of the virus threaten to undermine recent economic support measures. Mainland markets also seemed to seek relief in commments from Premier Li Keqiang on Wednesday that China will strive to achieve reasonable economic growth in the second quarter and stem rising unemployment. After rising on Wednesday following the Fed minutes, the dollar was little changed in Asia trade. It was barely changed against the yen at 127.30, while the euro was almost flat at $1.0675. The dollar index, which tracks the greenback against a basket of major peers was just 0.13% higher at 102.20. Moves in U.S. Treasury yields were also muted. The 10-year yield edged up to 2.781% and the policy-sensitive two-year yield was flat at 2.502%. Crude oil was steady after a cautious rally this week, with Brent crude flat at $114.03 per barrel and U.S. crude up 0.13% at $110.47. Spot gold was down 0.2% at $1,849.19 per ounce. [GOL/]

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SC
@Schmidy23 #droscrew
recently

the sky is blue nav

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@Navneet #droscrew
recently

HOW BAD IS INFLATION? My neighbour got a pre-declined credit card in the mail. CEO's are now playing miniature golf. Exxon-Mobil laid off 25 Congressmen. I saw a Mormon with only one wife. McDonald's is selling the 1/4 ouncer. Angelina Jolie adopted a child from America. Parents in Beverly Hills fired their nannies and learned their children's names. A truckload of Americans was caught sneaking into Mexico. Americans sneaking into India to settle down after retirement A picture is now only worth 200 words. The Treasure Island casino in Las Vegas is now managed by Somali pirates. Called to get Blue Book Value on my car. They asked if the gas tank was full or empty 🀣🀣🀣

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
recently

By Wayne Cole SYDNEY (Reuters) - Asian shares slid on Tuesday as relief at a rally on Wall Street was punctured by a retreat in U.S. stock futures, while the euro held near one-month highs as odds narrowed on a July rate rise from the ECB. After ending Monday firmer, Nasdaq futures lost 1.5%, with traders blaming an earnings warning from Snap (NYSE:SNAP) which saw shares in the Snapchat owner tumble 28%. S&P 500 futures slipped 0.9%, surrendering some of Monday's 1.8% bounce. EUROSTOXX 50 futures fell 0.5% and FTSE futures 0.6%. MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan dipped 0.8% in hesitant trading. Japan's Nikkei fell 0.8% and Chinese blue chips 1.1%. Markets had taken some comfort from U.S. President Joe Biden's comment on Monday that he was considering easing tariffs on China, and from Beijing's ongoing promises of stimulus. Unfortunately, China's zero-COVID policy, with attendant lockdowns, has already done considerable economic damage. "Following disappointing April activity data, we have downgraded our China GDP (gross domestic product) forecast again and now look for 2Q GDP to contract 5.4% annualised, previously β€’1.5%," warned analysts at JPMorgan (NYSE:JPM). "Our 2Q global growth forecast stands at just 0.6% annualised rate, easily the weakest quarter since the global financial crisis outside of 2020." Early surveys of European and U.S. manufacturing purchasing managers for May due on Tuesday could show some slowing in what has been a resilient sector of the global economy. Japan's manufacturing activity grew at the slowest pace in three months in May amid supply bottlenecks, while Toyota announced a cut in its output plans. Analysts have also been trimming growth forecasts for the United States given the Federal Reserve seems certain to hike interest rates by a full percentage point over the next two months. The hawkish message is likely to be driven home this week by a host of Fed speakers and minutes of the last policy meeting due on Wednesday. The European Central Bank is also turning more hawkish, with President Christine Lagarde surprising many by opening the door for a rate rise as early as July. That saw the euro at $1.0665, having bounced 1.2% overnight in its best session since early March. It now faces stiff chart resistance around $1.0756. The dollar also retreated versus sterling and a range of currencies, taking the dollar index down 0.9% overnight. It was last up a fraction at 102.240. Meanwhile the euro had jumped sharply to 136.05 Japanese yen, while the dollar faded a little to 127.65 yen. The pullback in the dollar helped gold regain some ground to $1,855 an ounce. [GOL/] Oil prices were caught between worries over a possible global downturn and the prospect of higher fuel demand from the U.S. summer driving season and Shanghai's plans to reopen after a two-month coronavirus lockdown. [O/R] U.S. crude eased 66 cents to $109.63 per barrel, while Brent lost 70 cents to $112.74.

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@TraderXx #StockTraders.NET
recently

$Veru out of the blue

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
recently

By Andrew Galbraith SHANGHAI (Reuters) - Asian shares jumped on Friday after China cut a key lending benchmark to support a slowing economy, but a gauge of global equities remained set for its longest weekly losing streak on record amid investor worries about sluggish growth. China cut its five-year loan prime rate (LPR) by 15 basis points on Friday morning, a sharper cut than had been expected, as authorities seek to cushion an economic slowdown by reviving the housing sector. The five-year rate influences the pricing of mortgages. MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan quickly built on early gains after the cut and was last up more than 1.8%. European equities were set to follow Asia's lead, with pan-region Euro Stoxx 50 futures, German DAX futures and FTSE futures all up more than 1%. Chinese blue-chips also rose 1.8%, boosted by foreign buying, and Hong Kong's Hang Seng index jumped more than 2%, while Australian shares rose 1.1%. In Tokyo, the Nikkei stock index gained 1.3%. "While it certainly will not suffice to reverse growth headwinds in Q2, (the cut) constitutes a move in the right direction so markets might be reacting to expectations of stronger easing going forward," said Carlos Casanova, senior Asia economist at Union Bancaire Privee in Hong Kong. Despite the gains in Asian shares, MSCI's All-Country World Price Index remained headed for its seventh straight week in the red, the longest such stretch since its inception in 2001. It would also be the longest including back-tested data extending to January 1988. Concerns over the impact of battered supply chains on inflation and growth have prompted investors to dump shares, with Cisco Systems Inc (NASDAQ:CSCO) on Thursday tumbling to an 18-month low after it warned of persistent component shortages, citing the impact of China's COVID lockdowns. On Friday, China's financial hub of Shanghai bruised residents' hopes for a smooth end to restrictions as it announced three new COVID-19 cases outside of quarantined areas - though plans to end a prolonged city-wide lockdown on June 1 appeared to remain on track. Industrial output in the city shrank more than 60% in April from a year earlier due to the impact of coronavirus restrictions. "The focus of (Chinese) officials has been to come up with easing policies to mitigate the impact of COVID suppression ... The problem is that such easing policies will not have any real impact so long as the COVID suppression policy is tightly enforced," said Christopher Wood, global head of equities at Jefferies. The gains in Asia came after a late rally on Wall Street petered out, leaving the Dow Jones Industrial Average down 0.75%, the S&P 500 0.58% lower and the Nasdaq Composite off by 0.26%. STRONGER YUAN In the currency market, the dollar index retreated from small earlier gains to nudge down 0.12% to 102.79, heading for its first losing week in seven. Moves elsewhere were muted, with the dollar just on the stronger side of flat against the safe-haven yen at 127.76. The euro was barely higher at $1.0586, erasing earlier losses. China's onshore yuan logged bigger moves, turning around from a 0.32% dip to strengthen to a two-week high of 6.6699 per dollar. The more freely traded offshore yuan also hit a two-week high at 6.6855 per dollar. While longer-dated U.S. government bond yields ticked higher following China's LPR cut, mirroring gains in equities, they later moderated. The U.S. 10-year yield was last at 2.855%, flat from Thursday's close, and down from a top of 2.922% earlier on Friday. The two-year yield climbed to 2.6327% compared with a U.S. close of 2.611%. Crude prices pared losses after China's LPR announcement but later extended falls on worries a demand recovery could falter. Brent crude was last down 0.53% at $111.45 per barrel and U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude was 1.21% lower at $110.85 per barrel. Gold bounced higher and was set for its first weekly gain since mid-April, helped by the weaker dollar. Spot gold, rose 0.26% to $1,846.49 per ounce. [GOL/]

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SU
@Suspex #Emporos Research
recently

Labeled Red are Weekly nPOC, Blue that extend to the right of the screen are daily nPocs

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@mat #FOREX
recently

blue is 1,11+, normal is green, yell, red, but this isnt normal tehn we wll see green

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@mat #FOREX
recently

see my h4 (day-s) lines green, yellow, red and then blue i see it on any tf

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
recently

By Wayne Cole SYDNEY (Reuters) - Asian share markets stumbled on Monday and oil prices slid after shockingly weak data from China underlined the deep damage lockdowns are doing to the world's second-largest economy. China's April retail sales plunged 11.1% on the year, almost twice the fall forecast, while industrial output dropped 2.9% when analysts had looked for a slight increase. "The data paint a picture of a stalling economy and one in need of more aggressive stimulus and a rapid easing of COVID restrictions, neither of which are likely to be forthcoming anytime soon," said Mitul Kotecha, head of emerging markets strategy at TD Securities. "China's weaker growth trajectory will add to pressure on its markets and fuel a further worsening in global economic prospects, weighing on risk assets. We expect further CNY depreciation." In Europe, EUROSTOXX 50 and FTSE futures both eased 0.3%. S&P 500 stock futures lost early gains to drop 0.6%, while Nasdaq futures fell 0.5%. Both are far from last year's highs, with the S&P having fallen for six straight weeks. China's central bank had also disappointed those hoping for a rate easing, though on Sunday Beijing did allow a further cut in mortgage loan interest rates for some home buyers. Monday's data overshadowed news that Shanghai aimed to reopen broadly and allow normal life to resume from June 1. Chinese blue chips shed 0.8% in reaction, while commodity currencies took a knock led by the Australian dollar which is often used as a liquid proxy for the yuan. MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan lost early gains to stand flat, following a slide of 2.7% last week, when it hit a two-year low. Japan's Nikkei clung to gains of 0.5%, having lost 2.1% last week even as a weak yen offered some support to exporters. Sky-high inflation and rising interest rates drove U.S. consumer confidence sink to an 11-year low in early May and raised the stakes for April retail sales due on Tuesday. DOWNGRADING GROWTH A hyper-hawkish Federal Reserve has driven a sharp tightening in financial conditions, which led Goldman Sachs (NYSE:GS) to cut its 2022 GDP growth forecast to 2.4%, from 2.6%. Growth in 2023 is now seen at 1.6% on an annual basis, down from 2.2%. "Our financial conditions index has tightened by over 100 basis points, which should create a drag on GDP growth of about 1pp," said Goldman Sachs economist Jan Hatzius. "We expect that the recent tightening in financial conditions will persist, in part because we think the Fed will deliver on what is priced." Futures imply 50 basis-point hikes in both June and July and rates between 2.5-3.0% by year end, from the current 0.75-1.0%. Fears that the tightening will lead to recession spurred a rally in bonds last week, which saw 10-year yields drop 21 basis points from peaks of 3.20%. Early Monday, yields were easing again to reach 2.91%. The pullback saw the dollar come off a two-decade top, though not by much. The dollar index was last at 104.560, and within spitting distance of the 105.010 peak. The euro stood at $1.0403, having got as low as $1.0348 last week. The dollar did lose ground on the yen, which seemed to get a safe-haven bid in the wake of the China data, slipping to 129.02 yen. In cryptocurrencies, Bitcoin was last up 2% at $30,354, having touched its lowest since December 2020 last week following the collapse of TerraUSD, a so-called stablecoin. In commodity markets, gold was pressured by high yields and a strong dollar and was last at $1,809 an ounce having shed 3.8% last week. Oil prices reversed course as the dire Chinese data rekindled worries about demand. Brent lost $2.31 to $109.24, while U.S. crude shed $2.14 to $108.35.

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@Atlas #Emporos Research
recently

EURUSD is in a bear market , the bear has good returns in both directions if you play the field right . Expect the price line to get near 1.07 before continuing the bear , or turning bull from there . Keep in mind that the month , within the blue square , shows that is at a crucial support line from previous years . We have three positions active at 1.04 , 1.05 , and 1.06 . We are expecting to hold this one for at least 5 months or 5,000 points profit . A good investment size for this trade is 10% of your investment capital , good luck .

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
recently

By Andrew Galbraith SHANGHAI (Reuters) - Asian shares bounced on Friday, but were set for a second straight weekly loss and remained near June 2020 lows, while the dollar hovered near 20-year highs as investors digested worries about strong inflation and tightening central bank policy. Those concerns ultimately overcame hopes on Wall Street that high inflation might be peaking, pushing the S&P 500 close to confirming a bear market on Thursday, at nearly 20% off its January all-time high. [.N] In an interview later in the day, U.S. Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said the battle to control inflation would "include some pain". And he repeated his expectation of half-percentage-point interest rate rises at each of the Fed's next two policy meetings, while pledging that "we're prepared to do more". After sharp losses a day earlier, Asian shares rallied on Friday. European equities were also set for a firmer open, with pan-region Euro Stoxx 50 futures up 1.08%, German DAX futures up 0.93% and FTSE futures gaining 0.98%. In afternoon trade, MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan was up around 1.8% from Thursday's 22-month closing low, trimming its losses for the week to less than 3%. Australian shares gained 1.93%, while Japan's Nikkei stock index jumped 2.64%. In China, the blue-chip CSI300 index was up 0.61% and Hong Kong's Hang Seng rose 2.22%. "We had some pretty big moves yesterday, and when you see those big moves it's only natural to get some retracement, especially since it's Friday heading into the weekend. There's not really a new narrative that's come through, " said Matt Simpson, senior market analyst at City Index. "I think there comes that point where you run out of sellers. I'm not really certain that this is going to be a buying rally at the moment, possibly a short-covering rally ahead of the weekend." The moves higher in equities were mirrored in slipping U.S. Treasuries, with the benchmark U.S. 10-year yield edging up to 2.8895% from a close of 2.817% on Thursday. The policy-sensitive 2-year yield was at 2.5924%, up from a close of 2.522%. "Within the shape of the U.S. Treasury curve we are not seeing any particularly fresh recession/slowdown signal, just the same consistent marked slowing earmarked for H2 2023," Alan Ruskin, macro strategist at Deutsche Bank (ETR:DBKGn), said in a note. The U.S. dollar remained near 20-year highs against a basket of currencies, supported by safe haven demand as Russia bristled over Finland's plan to apply for NATO membership, with Sweden potentially following suit. Moscow called Finland's announcement hostile and threatened retaliation, including unspecified "military-technical" measures. The dollar index, which tracks it against a group of currencies of other major trading partners, edged down about 0.1% to 104.65. But the greenback was stronger against the yen, which traded at 128.62 per dollar after hitting a two-week peak of 127.5 hit overnight. The European single currency was 0.1% firmer at $1.0389 after trading lower earlier in the day. Cryptocurrency bitcoin also turned higher, cracking through $30,000 after the collapse of TerraUSD, a so-called stablecoin, drove it to a 16-month low of around $25,400 on Thursday. In commodities markets, oil prices were higher against the backdrop of a pending European Union ban on Russian oil, but were still set for their first weekly loss in three weeks, hit by concerns over inflation and China's COVID lockdowns slowing global growth. U.S. crude ticked up 1.32% to $107.53 a barrel, and global benchmark Brent crude was up 1.6% at $109.17 per barrel. Spot gold, which had been driven to a three-month low by the soaring dollar, was up 0.16 % at $1,824.61 per ounce. [GOL/]

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@NoobBot #Crypto4Noobs
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Blue Studios, Unstoppable Domains Roll Out Family Crypto Wallets https://www.coindesk.com/business/2022/05/12/blue-studios-unstoppable-domains-roll-out-family-crypto-wallets/?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=rss&utm_campaign=headlines

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
recently

By Danilo Masoni MILAN (Reuters) - World shares turned lower on Wednesday and bond yields shot up after U.S. data showed inflation there slowed down less than expected last month, cementing expectations of aggressive rate hikes by the Federal Reserve. U.S. futures turned negative after data showed U.S. annual consumer price growth slowed to 8.3% in April from 8.5% in March, suggesting that inflation has probably peaked. The number, however, was above the 8.1% analyst had expected. Paolo Zanghieri, senior economist at Generali (BIT:GASI) Investments, said the data confirmed the view that the return of inflation to more tolerable values will take time. "Overall today's data add to the case of the strong front-loading called for by (|Fed Chair Jerome) Powell in the last meeting, who also suggested the possibility of two more 50bps rise in June and July," Zanghieri said. "However, this will keep concern on the possibility of a recession high, and ultimately weakening growth may lead the Fed to temper it tightening after the summer." MSCI's benchmark for global stocks was flat by 1247 GMT, having earlier risen as much as 0.3%. On Tuesday, the index fell to its lowest level since November 2020 on fears Fed tightening could significantly slow down the global economy. U.S. equity futures turned sharply negative, with the Nasdaq and S&P 500 e-minis down 1% and 0.6% respectively. The pan-European STOXX 600 equity benchmark index also trimmed gains, and was last up 0.2%. Money markets ramped up bets of Fed rate hikes by end-2022 to 208 basis points after the U.S. inflation numbers, compared to around 195 bps before. Earlier in Asia, equities squeezed higher from near two-year lows. Chinese blue chips rose 1.4% after Shanghai officials said half the city had achieved "zero COVID" status, and after U.S. President Joe Biden said he was considering eliminating Trump era tariffs on China. Chinese data released on Wednesday, however, showed consumer prices rose 2.1% from a year earlier, more than expected and at the fastest pace in five months, partly due to food prices. YIELDS SHOOT UP After falling to their lowest levels in almost a week earlier on Wednesday, benchmark 10-year Treasury yields turned positive after the inflation data, marching back towards the three-year high of 3.203% hit on Monday. The 10-year yield was last up 6 basis points on the day to 3.0502%, while the 2-year yield, which often reflects the Fed rate outlook, jumped 11 bps to 2.717%. Euro area government bond yields also sold off following the U.S. data, sending German 10-year yields up 8 bps to 1.084%. Bets over aggressive Fed tightening have also supported the dollar this year. The dollar index, which measures its performance against six main peers, reversed earlier weakness and was last up 0.1% to 104.04, closer to the two-decade high of 104.19 reached at the start of the week. The Fed last week raised interest rates by 50 basis points and Chair Jerome Powell said two more such hikes were likely at the upcoming policy meetings. There has also been speculation in markets the U.S. central bank will need to move by 75 basis points at one meeting and currently money markets are pricing over 190 basis points of combined rate hikes by year. "The current problem is that the market is convinced that the Fed is determined to fight inflation and therefore willing to tolerate market volatility and some demand destruction more than in the past. Personally, I'm less convinced of this determination," said Giuseppe Sersale, fund manager at Anthilia. Morgan Stanley (NYSE:MS) forecasts 2022 global economic growth to be less than half of last year's at 2.9%, down from a previous estimate of 3.2%. The U.S. bank also cut its year-end target for the S&P 500 by 11% to 3,900 points, while raising its U.S. 10-year yield forecast by 55 bps to 3.15%. Oil bounced back, buoyed by supply concerns as the European Union works on gaining support for a ban on Russian oil. [O/R] Brent rose 2.6% to $105.12 a barrel and U.S. crude rose 3% to $102.77. Spot gold dipped 0.1% to $1,836.2 an ounce.

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@NoobBot #Crypto4Noobs
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Sales of Blue-Chip NFTs Plunge Amid Crypto Market Crash https://cryptonews.com/news/sales-of-blue-chip-nfts-plunge-amid-crypto-market-crash.htm

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
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By Alun John HONG KONG (Reuters) - Asian shares squeezed higher on Wednesday from close to two-year lows hit in the previous session while the dollar held steady, ahead of keenly awaited U.S. inflation data that will offer a guide to how aggressively the Federal Reserve will raise rates. MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan rose 0.8%, having fallen to its lowest since July 2020 the day before. Japan's Nikkei gained 0.3%. European markets also were set to open higher, with EUROSTOXX 50 futures up 0.7%. Nasdaq futures added 0.8% and S&P 500 futures gained 0.4%. Chinese blue chips led Asia's gains, rising 2% helped by Shanghai officials saying half the city had achieved "zero COVID" status, and U.S. President Joe Biden saying he was considering eliminating Trump era tariffs on China as a way to lower prices for goods in the United States. But, "the main factor for markets right now is inflation, inflation, inflation," said Carlos Casanova, senior Asia economist at UBP. "Indian inflation was higher this week, Chinese inflation was higher than expected today, and everyone is concerned about U.S. inflation and the possibility of recession in the U.S., which rises with every rate hike," he said. Chinese data released earlier on Wednesday showed consumer prices gained 2.1% from a year earlier, above expectations and the fastest pace in five months, partly due to food prices. Factory-gate inflation, while also above expectations, eased to a one-year low. U.S. consumer price data, due at 1230 GMT, could give an indication of whether the Fed will raise rates even more aggressively to combat inflation. The Fed last week raised its target for overnight bank-to-bank lending by a half a percentage point, and Chair Jerome Powell said two more such hikes are likely at the U.S. central bank's coming policy meetings. There has also been speculation in markets the Fed will need to go in for a massive 75 basis point hike at one meeting. Aggressive tightening has sent U.S. Treasury yields higher, and supported the dollar. The dollar index, which measures the greenback against six main peers, was steady at 103.79, not far from the high of 104.49 reached at the start of the week is highest since December 2002. "The dollar's reaction to the CPI will be asymmetrical in our view," said CBA analysts in a note. "A positive surprise will encourage markets to increase pricing for a 75pt increase in the Funds rate later in the year and support the dollar, while a negative surprise will keep pricing for 50bp increases in June and July intact and leave the dollar steady." Analysts expect the U.S. consumer price index to show a sharp pullback in monthly growth, cooling to 0.2% in April from 1.2% in March. They also predict an annual increase of 8.1%, 0.4 percentage point lower than the prior 8.5%, which was the hottest reading since December 1981. U.S. Treasuries were also quiet ahead of the data. The benchmark 10-year note yield was little changed at 2.9774%, having fallen from a three-year high hit Monday. On the front end of the curve, the U.S. two-year yield, which often reflects the Fed rate outlook, was steady at 2.6228% Bitcoin was trading around $31,700, having staged a small recovery after falling below $30,000 on Tuesday for the first time since July 2021. Oil bounced back from declines the previous day as markets try to balance concerns that China's zero COVID policy will impact demand and that a proposed European Union ban on Russian oil will hit supply. U.S. crude rose 2.36% to $102.08 a barrel, having fallen below $100 on Tuesday for the first time this month. Brent rose 2.34% to $104.85. Spot gold as steady at to $1838.7 an ounce.

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@marketjay #marketassasins
recently

SPX also reflects a bear rally may be getting ready to occur as stated previous on SPX the blue line is a 7 year trendline which is now support below is a screen shot of SPX on the monthly, Weekly, Daily & hourly and look at what the market did at this level

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@Renato_Decarolis #decarolis
recently

Eni: Descalzi; presenza Russia marginale, usciremo da Blue Stream

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@mat #FOREX
recently

usdmxn up but im waiting d1 green 19,75 again d1 blue line 22

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@mat #FOREX
recently

usdnok sell looong term 8,15 d1 blue line (year?)

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@marketjay #marketassasins
recently

Nptoce the blue trend line was a 7 year resistance which places this level @ the $4000 level, market will not break level that easy as this is now a major support level heading into a critical report which creates volatility

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
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By Tommy Wilkes LONDON (Reuters) - Stocks fell heavily again on Monday and the dollar rocketed to a new two-decade high as worries about higher interest rates and a tightened lockdown in Shanghai deepened investors' fears that the global economy is rapidly heading for a slowdown. After a bruising session on Friday in which U.S. stocks sold off sharply as another rise in long-dated U.S. Treasury yields unnerved investors, markets were set for a rocky start to the week, with most indexes in the red. Central banks in the United States, Britain and Australia all raised interest rates last week, and investors are bracing for more tightening as policymakers try to get on top of soaring inflation. "We see recession risk over the next 12 to 18 months to be as high as about 30%," said Dan Ivascyn, group chief investment officer at bond giant PIMCO. "One of the key reasons for that is the Fed and other central banks appear dead set on getting inflation under control." There was plenty more for investors to worry about on Monday aside from tightening financial conditions. There appeared to be no let-up in China's zero-COVID policy, with Shanghai tightening the city-wide lockdown for 25 million residents. Speculation that Russian President Vladimir Putin might declare war on Ukraine in order to call up reserves during his speech at "Victory Day" celebrations also hurt market sentiment. Putin has so far characterised Russia's actions in Ukraine as a "special military operation", not a war. Wall Street futures headed sharply lower with the S&P 500 futures down 2% and Nasdaq futures 2.5%. The S&P 500 and Nasdaq on Friday posted their fifth straight week of declines -- their longest losing streak in a decade. The Euro STOXX weakened 2%. Germany's DAX lost 1.6% and Britain's FTSE 100 1.78%. MSCI's main emerging market stocks index fell 1.2% to its lowest level since July 2020. The MSCI World Index dropped 0.7%, leaving it not far from the 17-month intraday low reached on Friday. (Graphic- World equities: https://fingfx.thomsonreuters.com/gfx/ MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan fell 1.4% and Japan's Nikkei 2.53%. Chinese blue chips eased 0.8%, while in offshore markets the yuan fell to as low as 6.7759 per dollar, its weakest since October 2020. The big data event of the week is the U.S. consumer price report due on Wednesday, when only a slight easing in inflation is forecast, and certainly nothing to prevent the Federal Reserve from hiking by at least 50 basis points in June. U.S. 10-year bond yields on Monday reached a new 3-1/2 year high of 3.203%. DOLLAR DOMINANCE With investors juggling so many worries, one place they are looking for safety is in the dollar. The dollar index, which measures the greenback against a basket of currencies, rose as much as 0.4% to 104.19, the latest in a string of 20-year highs. "Risk appetite is fragile and yield spreads continue to suggest further upside on the Dollar Index," said Sean Callow, a senior FX strategist at Westpac. "We look for ongoing demand for DXY (the dollar index) on dips, with 104 already being probed and still potential for a run towards 107 multi-week." The soaring dollar is hammering other currencies. The euro briefly dropped back below $1.05 while the Japanese yen fell to its weakest since 2002. Expectations that the Fed will move more aggressively in raising interest rates are supporting the dollar, as is a sense among investors that the U.S. economy will hold up better than a euro zone hit by the fallout from the war in Ukraine. But rates are also rising in the euro zone. On Monday, Germany's 10-year bond yield hit a new highest level since 2014, buoyed by hawkish policymaker Robert Holzmann saying on Saturday that the European Central Bank should raise rates three times this year to combat inflation. The diary is full of Fed speakers this week, giving them plenty of opportunity to keep up the hawkish chorus. Oil prices initially see-sawed after the Group of Seven nations committed to banning or phasing out imports of Russian oil over time, before falling. Brent dropped 2.15% at $109.97 by 1115 GMT, while U.S. crude dropped 2.39% to $107.15. [O/R] Spot gold prices lost 1.24% to $1,859 an ounce, having struggled recently to gain traction as a safe haven. [GOL/]

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
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By Alun John HONG KONG (Reuters) - Asian shares tumbled to their lowest in seven weeks on Friday and the dollar stood tall as investors globally shunned riskier assets over fears that higher U.S. interest rates and China's reinforcement of its zero-COVID policy could hit growth hard. MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan shed 2.65% on Friday and fell to its lowest level since March 16, the day when Chinese vice premier Liu He boosted shares by pledging to support markets and the economy. The benchmark is down 3.8% from last Friday's close, which would be its worst week since mid-March. Japan's Nikkei bucked the trend, rising 0.56% on its return from a three-day holiday. Chinese blue chips shed 2%, the Hong Kong benchmark lost 3.44%, and China's yuan tumbled to an 18-month low in both onshore and offshore markets. Dickie Wong, director of research at Hong Kong brokerage Kingston Securities, attributed the falls to the Wall Street plunge overnight amid worries about aggressive U.S rate hikes, as well as fears about the health of the Chinese economy. China will fight any comments and actions that distort, doubt or deny the country's COVID-19 response policy, state television reported on Thursday, after a meeting of the country's highest decision-making body. Investors said that appeared to rule out any easing in the zero-COVID policy, which is slowing Chinese economic growth and snarling global supply chains. "The silver lining is the expectation that new Chinese fiscal measures could come out over the weekend," Wong said. "That's the only thing giving Asian markets some support at their current low valuations." Overnight, the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 both fell more than 3%, and the Nasdaq Composite shed 4.99% in its biggest single-day plunge since June 2020. [.N] Things looked less dire in Europe, where regional share futures fell 0.25% and FTSE futures lost 0.27%. U.S. futures were flat. "Risks remain elevated for a policy mistake – either by (the Fed) not tightening quickly enough to combat inflation or being overly hawkish, resulting in the end of the current business cycle," said David Chao, global market strategist for APAC ex-Japan at Invesco. U.S. payroll data due later on Friday will help traders gauge how hot the economy is running. The market is pricing in an 87% chance of a monster 75 basis point rate hike from the Fed at its meeting in June, according to the CME's FedWatch tool. That's even after the Fed raised rates by 50 basis points this week and Chair Jerome Powell ruled out a 75 basis point hike. U.S. yields are rising on expectations of a fast pace of rate hikes. The yield on U.S. 10-year notes was last 3.065% after crossing 3.1% overnight for the first time since November 2018. [US/] As investors moved towards less risky assets, the dollar index was at 103.75 on Friday, having hit a fresh 20-year peak of 103.94 overnight supported by expectations the U.S. will hike interest rates faster than other central banks. (FRX) The dollar index is 0.43% higher this week, its fifth consecutive week of gains. Sterling was trading around its lowest level against the dollar in nearly two years after falling 2.2% on Thursday. The Bank of England raised rates by 25 basis points as expected, but two policy makers expressed caution about rushing into future rate hikes. Bitcoin, one of the risk-friendliest assets, tumbled 8% overnight, hitting a two-and-a-half-month low. It was last trading around $36,500. Oil prices shrugged off concerns about global economic growth as worries about tightening supply underpinned prices ahead of the European Union's impending embargo on Russian oil. Brent futures rose 0.6% to $111.57 a barrel. U.S. crude rose 0.64 % to $108.95 a barrel. [O/R] Gold was flat at $1876.4 an ounce. [GOL/]

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@mat #FOREX
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vix d1 green/yellow/red 33,7/35/36 and blue 50+ => ...

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@NoobBot #Crypto4Noobs
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Here’s why blue-chip NFT prices continue to soar nearly a week after the Otherside mint https://cointelegraph.com/news/here-s-why-blue-chip-nft-prices-continue-to-soar-nearly-a-week-after-the-otherside-mint

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@Schmidy23 #droscrew
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short maple syrup long labbat blue?

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@lucullus #droscrew
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@Schmidy23 Blue?

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@Schmidy23 #droscrew
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didn't know you wore blue @lucullus

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@mzx9 #droscrew
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Big wheels keep on turnin' Carry me home to see my kin Singin' songs about the south-land I miss Alabamy once again and I think it's a sin, yes Well I heard Mister Young sing about her Well I heard ol' Neil put her down Well I hope Neil Young will remember A southern man don't need him around anyhow Sweet home Alabama Where the skies are so blue Sweet home Alabama Lord I'm comin' home to you In Birmingham they love the governor (boo-hoo-hoo) Now we all did what we could do Now Watergate does not bother me Does your conscience bother you? Tell the truth

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@dros #droscrew
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thanks blue

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@NoobBot #Crypto4Noobs
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β€˜Legacy’ NFT prices are soaring, but exactly what makes a collection a blue-chip? https://cointelegraph.com/news/legacy-nft-prices-are-soaring-but-exactly-what-makes-a-collection-a-blue-chip

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@AJAJ #droscrew
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they better make that whatsapp pay them > @dros said: $FB WhatsApp working on its own Twitter Blue-like subscription plan for business users - 9to5mac

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@dros #droscrew
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$FB WhatsApp working on its own Twitter Blue-like subscription plan for business users - 9to5mac

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
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By Huw Jones LONDON (Reuters) - Stocks edged higher on Wednesday, but gains were capped by questions over how far real bond yields will rise as investors sifted through disappointing Netflix (NASDAQ:NFLX) earnings and war continued in Ukraine. The STOXX index of 600 European companies gained 0.4% to 458.17 points. The MSCI all country stock index was 0.2% firmer. Investors kept a wary eye on the 10-year Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS), whose yields briefly broke above negative territory on Tuesday for the first time since March 2020. A rise in real yields poses a fresh headwind for risky assets such as stocks, especially big tech firms which report earnings next week, now more closely scrutinised after Netflix shares sank on Tuesday evening after news it was losing subscribers. Tech-heavy Nasdaq futures were down 0.6 percent, with S&P500 futures shedding 0.3% "You are going to have to see real yields in much more positive territory before they make stock markets less attractive," said Michael Hewson, chief market analyst at CMC Markets. "The bigger question the markets are wrestling with at the moment is has inflation peaked? If inflation has peaked, then maybe it's a good time to buy bonds again, which is why we are seeing so much uncertainty as to the future direction of the stock markets," Hewson said. The dollar climbed to a fresh two-decade peak to the yen, buoyed as the Bank of Japan stepped into the market again to defend its ultra low interest rate policy. Data is beginning to emerge from the International Monetary Fund this week on how much the two-month old war in Ukraine is hitting the global economy. The U.S. Federal Reserve issues its "Beige Book" of economic conditions from late February to early April on Wednesday. "We expect the pace of economic activity eased slightly to a modest pace," UniCredit analysts said in a note. In Europe, German producer prices hit a record high amid war in Ukraine. In an election which has rattled French bonds, President Emmanuel Macron and far-right candidate Marine Le Pen will face each other in a televised debate on Wednesday evening. Macron, however, appears to be pulling ahead of Le Pen in the polls ahead of Sunday's final round in the election. ASIA SHARES RISE MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan rose 0.3%, its first positive session in a week. Japan's Nikkei rose 0.8%, like other markets in the region tracking Tuesday's gains on Wall Street where the three main benchmarks had their best days in over a month, helped by several strong earnings results. The Nasdaq closed up 2.2%. China bucked the regional trend as Chinese blue chips shed 1.5% after the central bank kept its benchmark lending rates unchanged, despite frequent government pledges to support a slowing economy hit by the worst COVID-19 outbreak in two years. That decision in contrast helped the Chinese yuan recover after hitting its lowest since October in early trade. "Investors were looking for stimulus from China but the PBOC didn't deliver today," said Carlos Casanova. "Markets inevitably are going to interpret that in a negative way with the lockdowns extending into April and beyond, meaning the worst months for economic data are ahead of us." The yield on a highly -traded contract of China's 10-year government bond fell below U.S. 10-year Treasury yield for the first time since 2010 on earlier this month, and Chinese 10 year yields were last around 2.85%. Benchmark 10-year Treasury yields were within a whisker of 3% on Wednesday - though were little changed on the day. Yield differentials are also a factor for Japan, where the central bank on Wednesday offered to buy an unlimited amount of 10-year Japanese government bonds (JGB) at 0.25%, in its third move since February to defend its yield target. This yield curve control has sent the yen to 20-year lows against the dollar, but the dollar retreated 0.2% on the yen on Wednesday amid some nerves that intervention - verbal or otherwise - from Japanese authorities could drive a bounce. Oil prices rebounded from sharp losses in the previous session as concerns about tighter supplies from Russia and Libya dominated. Brent crude futures rose 1.2% to $108.55 a barrel. Spot gold fell 0.4% to its lowest in a week dragged down by higher yields.

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@marvin.oliver #vpatraders
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My expectation for DXY moving forward based on Elliott Wave Theory. My preferred count(and most likely scenario IMO) is the BLUE lines. The alternative RED lines could absolutely happen as well. Nice reaction off the level I pointed out before. I was watching USDJPY and USDCHF, as they appeared to be best position for short term moves down (so far so good). However, I would like to see AUDUSD (prefer .725 region for long) or NZDUSD move a bit lower before I go long on those pairs. EURUSD is the wild card until Election is settled this weekend. We could see a lot more EUR weakness there, (107-105 in the short term) so I will stay clear of that trade for now.

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@dros #droscrew
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that easy eh blue

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@dros #droscrew
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sums it up right there blue

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@scottzman #droscrew
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the hatred that is already in this country between red vs blue is sickening, this imho will be gasoline

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
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By Julie Zhu HONG KONG (Reuters) - Asian shares traded cautiously on Tuesday, with investors weighing China's measures to cushion an economic slowdown and the prospect of aggressive Federal Reserve monetary policy tightening. Investors are also bracing for a barrage of earnings that will help them assess the impact of the Ukraine war and a spike in inflation on company financials. Netflix (NASDAQ:NFLX), Tesla (NASDAQ:TSLA) and Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) are all to report this week. Moscow has refocused its ground offensive in Ukraine's two eastern provinces but Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy has vowed to fight on. Early in the Asian trading day, MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan was down 0.5% while U.S. stock futures, the S&P 500 e-minis, were up 0.2%. Australia's S&P/ASX 200 edged up 0.66%, as strong commodity prices lifted mining and energy stocks, while Japan's Nikkei rose 0.18%. China's blue-chip CSI300 index was 0.06% higher in early trade while the Shanghai Composite Index rose 0.24%. Hong Kong's Hang Seng index opened down 2.4%, pressured by a slump in tech giants listed in the city amid China's latest regulatory crackdown on the sector. The People's Bank of China (PBOC) said on Friday it would cut the reserve requirement for all banks by 25 basis points (bps), releasing about 530 billion yuan ($83.25 billion) in long-term liquidity to cushion a slowdown. Investors, however, felt the smaller-than-expected cut might not be enough to reverse a sharp slowdown in the world's No. 2 economy that could significantly affect global growth. China's gross domestic product (GDP) on Monday beat analysts' expectations with a 4.8% increase in the first quarter from a year earlier, while data on March activity showed weakness in consumption, property and exports affected by COVID-19 curbs. Analysts said the key question was whether authorities would make adjustments to the tough anti-COVID-19 measures. "We expect more policy support, mainly in the form of more infrastructure investment, stronger credit growth, and easier property policy. But we do not see the government undertake 'whatever it takes' to achieve the 5.5% growth target, nor shift the Covid policy soon," said Wang Tao, Head of Asia Economics and Chief China Economist of UBS Investment Bank Research. Wall Street ended the day lower in a choppy trading day on Monday, as investors contrasted Bank of America (NYSE:BAC)'s positive quarterly earnings with surging bond yields ahead of further earnings cues this week. A significant cut to global growth expectations from the World Bank, paired with March weakness in China's latest economic numbers injected some pessimism into U.S. markets, which opened Monday following a holiday-shortened previous week. The Dow Jones Industrial Average ended down 0.11%, while the S&P 500 dipped 0.02% and the Nasdaq Composite slid 0.14%. Markets were closed on Monday in Australia, Hong Kong and many parts of Europe for the Easter holiday. The benchmark 10-year Treasury yield was last at 2.845%, after previously hitting 2.884% earlier on Monday, the highest since December 2018, as investors adjusted for the Federal Reserve to raise rates by 50 basis points at its May and June meetings to contain rapid inflation. The two-year yield, which rises with traders' expectations of higher Fed fund rates, touched 2.4459% compared with a U.S. close of 2.46%. The dollar index, a gauge of the greenback's value against six major currencies, was up at 100.88 after surging to 100.86 on Monday, the highest since April 2020. Oil prices were slightly lower on Tuesday, after having been boosted by concerns over tight global supply amid the Ukraine crisis in the previous sessions. U.S. crude dipped 0.57% to $107.59 a barrel. Brent crude fell to $112.7 per barrel. Gold prices steadied on Tuesday, after getting within a stone's throw of the key $2,000 per ounce level in the previous session. Spot gold traded at $1,977.18 per ounce. [GOL/]

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
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By Kevin Yao and Stella Qiu BEIJING (Reuters) - China's economy slowed in March as consumption, real estate and exports were hit hard, taking the shine off faster-than-expected first-quarter growth numbers and worsening an outlook already weakened by COVID-19 curbs and the Ukraine war. The biggest near-term challenge for Beijing is the tough new coronavirus rules at a time of heightened geopolitical risks, which have intensified supply and commodity cost pressures, leaving Chinese authorities walking a tight rope as they try to stimulate growth without endangering price stability. Gross domestic product (GDP) expanded by 4.8% in the first quarter from a year earlier, data from the National Bureau of Statistics showed on Monday, beating analysts' expectations for a 4.4% gain and picking up from 4.0% in the fourth quarter. A surprisingly strong start in the first two months of the year improved the headline figures, with GDP up 1.3% in January-March in quarter-on-quarter terms, compared with expectations for a 0.6% rise and a revised 1.5% gain in the previous quarter. Analysts say April data will likely be worse, with lockdowns in commercial centre Shanghai and elsewhere dragging on, prompting some to warn of rising recession risks. "Further impacts from lockdowns are imminent, not only because there has been a delay in the delivery of daily necessities, but also because they add uncertainty to services and factory operations that have already impacted the labour market," said Iris Pang, Greater China chief economist at ING. "We may need to revise our GDP forecasts further if fiscal support does not come in time." China's shares fell, likely reacting to the March numbers and a weak outlook - the blue chip CSI300 index was down 0.6%, while the Shanghai Composite Index dropped 0.5%. WORSENING RETAIL SALES, JOBLESS RATE Data on March activity showed retail sales contracting the most on an annual basis since April 2020 on widespread COVID curbs across the country. They fell 3.5%, worse than expectations for a 1.6% decrease and an increase of 6.7% in January-February. The job market is already showing signs of stress in March, a usually robust month for labour market as factories resume hiring after the Lunar New Year holiday. China's nationwide survey-based jobless rate stood at 5.8% in March, the highest since May 2020, while that in 31 major cities hit a record 6.0%. The industrial sector held up better with production expanding 5.0% from a year earlier, compared with forecasts for a 4.5% gain. That was down from a 7.5% increase in the first two months of the year. Fixed asset investment, a driver of growth that Beijing is counting on to underpin the economy, increased 9.3% year-on-year in the first quarter, compared with an expected 8.5% increase but down from 12.2% growth in the first two months. Analysts at Capital Economics and Nomura believe the official GDP figures may have understated the slowdown last quarter. Capital Economics says growth in services production index for Q1 does not align with the expansion of the services sector in the GDP data, while Nomura said some of the March data, such as industrial production, are hard to reconcile with many other indicators of industrial activity. Home sales by value in March slumped 26.2% year-on-year, the biggest drop since January-February 2020, according to Reuters calculations, pointing to a deepening downturn in the property market. 'HIGHLY COSTLY' COVID-19 CURBS The government's determination to stop the spread of record COVID-19 cases has clogged highways and ports, stranded workers and shut factories - disruptions that are rippling through global supply chains for goods from electric vehicles to iPhones. The contribution from net exports to GDP growth fell to 3.7% in the first quarter from 26.4% in the fourth as momentum ebbed. Fu Linghui, a NBS spokesman, acknowledged the increase in downward economic pressure. "We will step up the implementation of macro policies, make every effort to stabilise the economic fundamentals, and strive to achieve the targets and tasks for the year," Fu told a news conference. The People's Bank of China (PBOC) said on Monday it would step up support for industries, firms and people hit by COVID-19 in its latest move to cushion them from the impact of economic slowdown. Late on Friday, the PBOC said it would cut the amount of cash that banks must hold as reserves for the first time this year, releasing about 530 billion yuan ($83.25 billion) in long-term liquidity, although the reduction missed expectations. Analysts see less room for more China rate cuts, after the smaller-than-expected RRR reduction, which they say reflected the PBOC's concern about inflation and U.S. monetary tightening. "The government faces a dilemma: how to balance economic growth and containing the outbreaks. Locking down large cities like Shanghai is highly costly," said Zhiwei Zhang, chief economist at Pinpoint Asset Management. "Such costs will become more visible in coming months."

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
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By Stella Qiu and Alun John BEIJING (Reuters) - Asian shares tracked Wall Street higher on Thursday, while U.S. Treasury yields eased and the dollar retreated, as the latest U.S. data raised hopes that inflation may be close to peaking, though several major central banks raised rates aggressively. Traders were waiting for a European Central Bank meeting later in the day to see if it was as hawkish as others have been. Share market sentiment received a boost from China's announcement late on Wednesday that authorities should cut banks' reserve requirement ratios (RRR) soon to support an economy battered by COVID-19 lockdowns. [nL2N2WB0UH] MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan rose 0.4%, buoyed by a 0.5% gain in Australia's resource-heavy shares and a 1.2% advance in mainland China's blue chip stocks. Japan's Nikkei was up 1.2%. European markets are set to open higher, with EUROSTOXX 50 futures up 0.56%, German DAX futures rising 0.56%, and FTSE futures gaining 0.24% in Asia trade. S&P500 futures rose 0.2% and Nasdaq futures were 0.4% higher. David Chao, Hong Kong-based global market strategist at Invesco, said several developments were boosting shares on Thursday, including moderating gains in U.S. core consumer prices, which could mean inflation pressures may start to abate soon, and China's announcement of more policy support. "I've argued that an upswing in money supply and credit growth could provide a floor for Chinese equities and signal that investor sentiment may soon start to improve, especially if COVID and geopolitical concerns start to wane," Chao said. Elsewhere, other central banks reinforced the hawkish global mood ahead of the ECB meeting. The Bank of Korea surprised markets with a rate hike and the Monetary Authority of Singapore also tightened policy. That did not appear to affect the sentiment much. South Korean shares KOSPI reversed earlier losses to be up 0.1%, while Singapore's benchmark Straits Times Index also rose slightly. Equity markets have suffered from central banks' hawkishness, but all three Wall Street indexes gained over 1% on Wednesday. Asian markets including Hong Kong, Singapore and Australia are on holiday on Friday for the long Easter weekend, as are major European and U.S. markets. Hopes that U.S. inflation may have peaked led U.S. Treasury yields to extend their decline on Thursday. The yield on 10-year Treasury notes was at 2.6636%, compared to an over three-year peak of 2.836%, before the data released on Tuesday showed inflation running less hot than investors had feared. The two-year yield, which rises with traders' expectations of higher Fed fund rates, touched 2.3156%, compared with a close of 2.3645% the previous day. Retreating U.S. yields offered some relief to the bruised yen on Thursday, with the safe haven currency up 0.3% against the greenback. It had weakened past the 126 yen per dollar mark in the previous session. The prospect of fast and aggressive U.S. interest rate hikes and growing market expectations that the Bank of Japan will keep rates ultra-low in the near term have weakened the yen. The euro also gained 0.2% against the dollar, although it was not too far away from its 1-month low on concerns about the war in Ukraine. Ukraine warned on Wednesday that Russia was ramping up efforts in the south and east as it seeks full control of Mariupol, while Western governments committed more military help to bolster Kyiv. Oil prices fell on Thursday, after rising sharply in the first half of the week, as traders weighed a larger-than-expected build in U.S. oil stocks against tightening global supply. [O/R] U.S. crude dipped 0.48% to $103.75 a barrel. Brent crude fell 0.1% to $108.70 per barrel. Gold was slightly lower, hovering around its 1-month high. Spot gold was traded at $1,974.72 per ounce. [GOL/]

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@dros #droscrew
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blue always coming through in the clutch

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@NoobBot #Crypto4Noobs
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Is the surge in OpenSea volume and blue-chip NFT sales an early sign of an NFT bull market? https://cointelegraph.com/news/is-the-surge-in-opensea-volume-and-blue-chip-nft-sales-an-early-sign-of-an-nft-bull-market

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@NoobBot #Crypto4Noobs
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Blue Chip and Metaverse NFTs propel growth of NFT Market, says Nansen report https://cointelegraph.com/news/blue-chip-and-metaverse-nfts-propel-growth-of-nft-market-says-nansen-report

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
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By Wayne Cole SYDNEY (Reuters) - Shares slid and bond yields climbed on Monday as caution gripped markets ahead of central bank meetings and U.S. inflation data, while the euro managed only a brief gain on relief the far right did not win the first round of French presidential elections. French leader Emmanuel Macron and far right challenger Marine Le Pen qualified on Sunday for what promises to be a tightly fought presidential election runoff on April 24. A Le Pen victory could send shockwaves through France and Europe in ways similar to Britain's vote in 2016 to leave the European Union (EU). The first round result was close enough to leave the euro barely changed at $1.0883, after an initial pop to $1.0950. The mood in equity markets was cautious, with MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan falling 1.3%. Japan's Nikkei dropped 0.7%, having shed 2.6% last week, while Chinese blue chips lost 2.4%. S&P 500 stock futures eased 0.6% and Nasdaq futures 0.7%. EUROSTOXX 50 futures lost 0.8%, and FTSE futures 0.4%. Earnings season kicks off this week with JP Morgan, Wells Fargo (NYSE:WFC), Citi, Goldman Sachs (NYSE:GS) and Morgan Stanley (NYSE:MS) all due to report. Up to now, Wall Street has fared surprisingly well in the face of a vicious selloff in bonds which saw 10-year Treasury yields surge 31 basis points last week. [US/] Yields were last up at a three-year high of 2.77%, and topped Chinese bond yields for the first time since 2010. Markets have raced to price in the risk of ever-larger rate hikes from the Federal Reserve with futures implying rises of 50 basis points at both the May and June meetings. BofA's U.S. economist Ethan Harris now expects half-point hikes at each of the next three meetings and a cycle peak around 3.25-3.50%. "If inflation looks like it is heading below 3%, then our current call should be hawkish enough," Harris said in a note. "Conversely, if inflation gets stuck above 3% then the Fed will need to hike until growth drops close to zero, risking a recession." INFLATION TESTS ECB All of which underlines the importance of the March U.S. consumer price report on Tuesday where the median forecast is for a stratospheric rise of 1.2%, taking annual inflation to an eye-watering 8.5%. China's inflation figures surprised on the high side on Monday and, while relatively modest at 1.5% year-on-year in March, still dented hopes for aggressive policy easing from Beijing. Inflation will also be front and centre for the European Central Bank meeting on Thursday where the risk is for a hawkish slant to the statement. "Inflation has jumped well above where the ECB thought it would be just one month ago," noted analysts at TD Securities "We expect a dramatic shift from the ECB, with the announcement of an early end to QE in May and setting the groundwork, but not quite committing to, a June hike." Continuing the tightening theme, central banks in Canada and New Zealand could well raise rates by 50 basis points at their policy meetings this week. [CA/INT] [NZ/INT] The outsized rise in Treasury yields has seen the dollar index top 100 for the first time since May 2020, and it was last trading at 99.858. The main casualty has been the yen as the Bank of Japan remains dedicated to keeping its policy super-loose and bond yields near zero. The dollar was up at 124.92 yen, having gained 1.5% last week to just below its recent peak of 125.10. In commodity markets, thermal coal was the stand out winner last week with a rise of almost 13% after the EU banned imports of Russian coal. Gold managed a weekly gain of 1.1% but has been undermined by the huge rise in bond yields and was last flat at $1,942 an ounce. [GOL/] Oil prices remained under pressure after world consumers announced plans to release crude from strategic stocks and as Chinese lockdowns continued. [O/R] Early Monday, Brent was down $2.05 at $100.73, while U.S. crude lost $2.10 to $96.16.

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@Chano #StockTraders.NET
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that doesn't work for me, the sizes I currently trade are minimal, the loses now are not the issue, plus I swing long blue chip stocks often and I would be stopped out on those because I get wild swings on them

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Key Metrics

Market Cap

225.79 M

Beta

1.90

Avg. Volume

2.33 M

Shares Outstanding

71.45 M

Yield

0%

Public Float

0

Next Earnings Date

2022-08-09

Next Dividend Date

Company Information

bluebird bio is pioneering gene therapy with purpose. From its Cambridge, Mass., headquarters, they're developing gene and cell therapies for severe genetic diseases and cancer, with the goal that people facing potentially fatal conditions with limited treatment options can live their lives fully. Beyond their labs, the companyΒ is working to positively disrupt the healthcare system to create access, transparency and education so that gene therapy can become available to all those who can benefit.

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