$STEP

StepStone Group Inc

  • NASDAQ
  • Finance
  • Financial Conglomerates
  • Investment Managers
  • Finance and Insurance
  • Securities and Commodity Exchanges

PRICE

$27.92 -

Extented Hours

VOLUME

454,308

DAY RANGE

27.28 - 28.31

52 WEEK

22.39 - 54.75

Join Discuss about STEP with like-minded investors

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@Pyrognosis #droscrew
12 minutes ago

They are bullish the lower middle class will have to step down adn start shopping at DT

8 Replies 2 πŸ‘ 5 πŸ”₯

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@NoobBot #Crypto4Noobs
2 hours ago

Circle Asks US Fed Not to Step on Its Toes by Launching a Digital Dollar https://www.coindesk.com/policy/2022/05/25/circle-asks-us-fed-not-to-step-on-its-toes-by-launching-a-digital-dollar/?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=rss&utm_campaign=headlines

25 Replies 8 πŸ‘ 11 πŸ”₯

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@Jonove #droscrew
recently

One step towards perfecting the sex doll

93 Replies 14 πŸ‘ 13 πŸ”₯

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@singletary #StockTraders.NET
recently

very. don't ride and step in front of rally. have to wait for a fft or no trade

129 Replies 15 πŸ‘ 8 πŸ”₯

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@marketjay #marketassasins
recently

Setting limit sell order for ROI at 1.40 (Easy step by step snipe, and will not need to monitor position)

135 Replies 8 πŸ‘ 8 πŸ”₯

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@NoobBot #Crypto4Noobs
recently

G7 financial officials call on Financial Stability Board to step up crypto regulationβ€”report https://cointelegraph.com/news/g7-financial-officials-call-on-financial-stability-board-to-step-up-crypto-regulation-report

46 Replies 6 πŸ‘ 8 πŸ”₯

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
recently

By Rowena Edwards LONDON (Reuters) -Oil prices rose on Wednesday on expectations that easing COVID-19 restrictions in China will boost demand and as supply concerns grew. Brent crude was up $1.92, or 1.7%, at $113.85 a barrel at 1225 GMT, while U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude climbed $2.69, or 2.4%, to $115.09 a barrel, reversing some of the previous session's losses. Hopes of further lockdown easing in China boosted expectations for demand recovery. The country's authorities allowed 864 of Shanghai's financial institutions to resume work, sources said on Wednesday, a day after the Chinese city achieved a milestone of three consecutive days with no new COVID cases outside quarantine zones. And China has relaxed some COVID test rules for U.S. and other travellers. The market also saw support from rising supply concerns. Russian crude output in April fell by nearly 9% from the previous month, an internal OPEC+ report showed on Tuesday, as Western sanctions on Moscow curbed exports. The price rise is being capped by reports that the U.S. is planning to relax sanctions against Venezuela and allow Chevron Corp (NYSE:CVX) to negotiate oil licences with Venezuela's national producer. "Though this will bring little relief to the market in the short term, it would nonetheless be a first step towards ensuring that more oil could reach the market in future from currently sanctioned countries," Commerzbank (ETR:CBKG) analyst Barbara Lambrecht said. The European Union's failure to persuade Hungary to lift its veto on a proposed embargo on Russian oil is adding price pressure, although some diplomats expect agreement on a phased ban at a summit at the end of May. The EU intends to mobilise up to 300 billion euros of investments by 2030 to end its reliance on Russian oil and gas, European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said on Wednesday. "In the meantime, the oil market will likely take its cues from today’s EIA update concerning US oil stocks," PVM analyst Stephen Brennock said. U.S. crude and gasoline stocks fell last week, according to market sources citing American Petroleum Institute figures on Tuesday. For the economic outlook, U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell on Tuesday said the central bank would ratchet up interest rates as high as needed to stifle inflation that he said threatened the foundation of the economy.

125 Replies 15 πŸ‘ 8 πŸ”₯

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@dros #droscrew
recently

Shanghai Takes First Step in Lockdown Exit as Tensions Rise in Beijing -- WSJ

45 Replies 14 πŸ‘ 9 πŸ”₯

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@NoobBot #Crypto4Noobs
recently

**@CNBC:** This 35-year-old turned her side hustle into a $141 million companyβ€”here's the 5-step business plan she used. (via @CNBCMakeIt) https://t.co/HOeqjSBy7J https://twitter.com/CNBC/status/1525877989694750723

136 Replies 6 πŸ‘ 12 πŸ”₯

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@NoobBot #Crypto4Noobs
recently

**@CNBC:** This 35-year-old turned her side hustle into a $141 million companyβ€”here's the 5-step business plan she used. (via @CNBCMakeIt) https://t.co/5ehRDGBdz3 https://twitter.com/CNBC/status/1525372217592320000

68 Replies 7 πŸ‘ 12 πŸ”₯

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@dros #droscrew
recently

I mean if I had good intentions then did something like that I might go missing for a few hours because of super guilt and depresssion then step up

114 Replies 14 πŸ‘ 10 πŸ”₯

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@CarlosH-carvan #ivtrades
recently

Yes..the same to me.....i did the bad step last year to open positions in midterm and now i am recovering this loss money and the spent in my treatment on March

57 Replies 12 πŸ‘ 14 πŸ”₯

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@hidalgjo #ivtrades
recently

Not sure if the gap is filled Carlos > @CarlosH-carvan said: $AFRM gap filled....intraday volume at same step than canddles

150 Replies 8 πŸ‘ 6 πŸ”₯

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@CarlosH-carvan #ivtrades
recently

$AFRM gap filled....intraday volume at same step than canddles

58 Replies 8 πŸ‘ 10 πŸ”₯

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@Chano #StockTraders.NET
recently

the lower the $SPY goes the less territory for traders is and the more terrotory for investors to step in

66 Replies 10 πŸ‘ 14 πŸ”₯

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@Benlax #droscrew
recently

Taking a step back. What you want to see in a bottom has happened: Net hedge fund exposure is at 0 % tile and same level as march 2020. Chart below CTA exposure close to 5 year low Max hedge fund pain as can be seen from reported returns ytd and 13F filings. ARKK almost down the pandemic lows with any bubble valuations completely taken out. Heavy volume as we saw the past 2 register the 7thh and 8th highest volume days of the year AAII bull index at historic low Investor intelligence survey at close to 5 year low Hedge fund crowded long index vs spx hit 24, backtest great SPX P/E rate at 16.87, down 6 turns from high Tick Index his -1979 Friday, backtest great Nasdaq new highs minus new lows hit -1200. See chart below Correlation at extreme highs Put/Call ratio very elevated Beta of retail top 10 holdings has fallen sharply. Chart below While fundamental backdrop has improved: 5 year Inflation break evens have fallen sharply which is a major positive. 5 year inflation break evens are now the same level as when SPX was at 4800 in early January. Average hourly earnings have peaked and are now annualizing at 3.7% vs 6.3% 6 months ago. Used car prices falling as evidenced by Manheim Index Fed hawkishness has peaked. S&P 500 Earnings estimates have risen coming out of earnings season. Jobless claims remain at historic lows 10 yr yield is declining which has taken equity risk premium up to highest level since late march.

51 Replies 13 πŸ‘ 12 πŸ”₯

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
recently

By Anshuman Daga SINGAPORE (Reuters) - Asian equities slipped to the lowest in nearly two years on Tuesday, before trimming losses, as investors fretted about the toxic cocktail of rising interest rates and weaker economic growth. Sentiment was supported by gains in U.S. stock futures, which turned positive after declining earlier. S&P 500 stock futures and Dow Jones futures both rose 0.6%, while Nasdaq futures gained 1.3%. Growing fears of recession and a slowdown in China dragged on commodity-linked currencies and oil prices, though safety flows kept the dollar near 20-year highs. MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares ex-Japan traded down 0.8% in early afternoon but pared sharp losses struck earlier. The benchmark had fallen as much as 2.3% to 515.7, sliding for a seventh straight session and extending losses to 18% so far this year. "Chinese growth is facing significant headwinds, whether you look at official or private sector Purchasing Managers' Index," said Song Seng Wun, an economist at CIMB Private Banking. "Softening global growth is the persistent wall of worry for markets as investors look beyond the next 3-6 months. The view on growth momentum seems to be that revenge spending after the pandemic may be affected by higher borrowing costs," he said. Across Asia, share indexes recovered from the day's losses. The Nikkei lost 0.4%, Australian shares shed 1.1%, Korean stocks lost 0.5% and Taiwan equities edged up 0.1%. MSCI's Asian benchmark fell to the lowest since early July 2020. Chinese equities are the worst performers among major markets so far this year, recording losses of between 21 and 25%. Singapore and Indonesian stock indexes have, however, remained steady. Growth worries resurfaced after central banks in the United States, Britain and Australia raised interest rates last week and investors girded for more tightening as policymakers fight soaring inflation. Hong Kong's benchmark share index returned from a one-day holiday sharply lower on Tuesday and slumped more than 4% before halving losses. On Monday, Shanghai and Beijing tightened COVID-19 curbs which have already taken a heavy toll on the world's second-largest economy. China's export growth slowed to its weakest in almost two years, data showed, as the central bank pledged to step up support for the slowing economy Overnight, U.S. stocks extended Friday's bruising sell-off as investors rushed to protect themselves against the prospect of a weakening economy. [.N] "The idea of a benign and gentle tightening cycle has evaporated," ANZ analysts said in a report. "The reality is that the Fed cannot control the supply side of the economy in the short-run, so as long as key indicators like the labour force participation rate stay low and Chinese exports slow, the risk to inflation, and therefore interest rates, lies to the upside," ANZ said. Oil prices retreated again on demand worries as coronavirus lockdowns in China, the top oil importer, continued. Brent crude fell 0.9% to $105 a barrel and U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude declined 1% to $102 a barrel, adding to a 6% slump in the previous session. Both contracts are still up about 35% so far this year. Commodity-linked currencies including the Australian and Canadian currencies took a beating as oil prices fell. The Australian dollar dropped as low as $0.6920, its weakest since July 2020, having fallen 1.7% overnight. Lower oil prices also hit the Canadian dollar, which eased to C$1.3037 per dollar, its weakest since November 2020. The dollar index eased 0.2% to 103.5, having risen as high as 104.19 overnight, a fresh 20-year peak. U.S. Treasury yields, which have climbed sharply on expectations of aggressive tightening by the Federal Reserve, took a breather after Atlanta Fed President Raphael Bostic pushed back on suggestions of a massive 75 basis point rate hike at the Fed's next meeting.

126 Replies 8 πŸ‘ 9 πŸ”₯

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
recently

By Peter Nurse Investing.com - European stock markets are expected to open higher Tuesday, starting the new month on a positive note as investors await more corporate earnings and the prospect of key central banks tightening monetary policy. At 2 AM ET (0600 GMT), the DAX futures contract in Germany traded 0.6% higher, CAC 40 futures in France climbed 0.6%, and the FTSE 100 futures contract in the U.K. rose 0.6%. European equity markets are trying to shake off a weak showing in April, with the major indices weighed by concerns about economic growth slowing, rising inflation, and Russia’s ongoing war in Ukraine. A lot of attention will be on central banks this week as a number hold policy-setting meetings that could determine market sentiment for weeks to come. The Reserve Bank of Australia started the ball rolling earlier Tuesday, raising its main cash rate by 25 basis points to 0.35%, its first hike in more than a decade, as the central bank began withdrawing its extraordinary monetary support. The Federal Reserve starts its two-day later Tuesday, and is expected to raise rates by a half-point when it hands down its policy decision on Wednesday. The Fed raised its policy interest rate by 25 basis points in March and is soon likely to begin asset trimming, as it tightens its monetary policy. The Bank of England will also hand down its policy decision on Thursday, and is expected to raise interest rates to their highest level in 13 years. In the corporate sector, HSBC (LON:HSBA) is likely to be in focus after its largest shareholder, Chinese insurance giant Ping An (OTC:PNGAY), called for a break-up of the U.K.-headquartered bank, one of Europe’s largest. Logitech (NASDAQ:LOGI) reported a 20% drop in sales for its fourth quarter, and the computer hardware manufacturer reduced its fiscal year 2023 outlook, removing the estimate of annual sales and profits that would have been generated in Ukraine and Russia. Elsewhere, German unemployment data for April are due later in the session along with the March Eurozone PPI release. Oil prices edged lower Tuesday but remained elevated as the European Union is expected to firm up plans to tighten sanctions on Russia this week, potentially agreeing an embargo on Moscow’s oil. There has been disagreement within the bloc over whether to take this next step, but expectations are rising with Germany, the union’s largest economy and de facto leader, saying it was prepared to back an immediate embargo. A deal could include exceptions for Hungary and Slovakia, both heavily dependent on Russian oil imports. U.S. inventory data for the week ended April 29 from the American Petroleum Institute industry group are due later in the session, as a precursor for government data from the Energy Information Administration on Wednesday. By 2 AM ET, U.S. crude futures traded 0.2% lower at $104.95 a barrel, while the Brent contract fell 0.3% to $107.30. Additionally, gold futures fell 0.1% to $1,860.99/oz, while EUR/USD traded 0.1% higher at 1.0507.

119 Replies 14 πŸ‘ 12 πŸ”₯

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
recently

By Alun John HONG KONG (Reuters) - Asian shares were set for their best day in six weeks on Friday led by Chinese tech stocks after reports of a possible resolution to the Sino-U.S. audit dispute, giving investors much needed respite from worries of a global economic slowdown. Still, a key regional share index was set for its worst month in nine as the Ukraine war and expectations for aggressive U.S. rate hikes in coming months have added to the anxieties, propelling the safe-haven dollar to near 20-year peaks. Hong Kong listed tech stocks rose as much as 10% on Friday as trading resumed after the lunchtime pause. Ecommerce players JD (NASDAQ:JD).com and Alibaba (NYSE:BABA) each rose as much as 15% and Meituan gained around 12%. All three are listed in both the U.S. and Hong Kong bourses. They and their peers' stock prices had been affected by U.S. moves to delist Chinese companies because Beijing restricted the U.S. audit regulator's access to their audit documents. Reports on Friday that a resolution to the dispute was in sight had driven the sharp gains, said Steven Leung executive director of institutional sales at brokerage UOB Kay Hian in Hong Kong. The gains from Chinese index heavyweights sent MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan 1.9% higher, which would be its best day since March 17. Also helping was the Politburo, the top decision-making body of China's Communist Party, saying China will step up policy support to stabilise the economy, and a strong Wall Street after robust earnings from Facebook (NASDAQ:FB) parent Meta Platforms had driven the Nasdaq 3% higher overnight. [.N] However, Nasdaq futures fell around 0.7% in Asia trade, pressured by disappointing earnings from Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN) after market close. European futures rose 1.29% and FTSE futures advanced 0.86%. LONGER TERM FEARS Friday's gains marked a recovery to the brutal sell-offs in globally stocks in recent weeks. The Asian regional benchmark is heading for a 5.6%% drop for the month, its worst month since July 2021. Until Friday's gains, it was set for its worst month in two years. "There are four near term catalysts driving the market at the moment: U.S. earnings which we are about half way through, rising U.S. Treasury yields and lots of hawkish speak from the Fed, the war in Ukraine, and China policy," said Fook-Hien Yap, senior investment strategist at Standard Chartered (OTC:SCBFF) Wealth Management. Yap believes Asian shares have room to rise further as much of the bad news was already priced in, though a strong rally in risk assets like equities would need U.S. yields to steady. The benchmark 10 year yield finished the U.S. session at 2.8205%, having reached as high as 2.981% on April 20. The two year yield was at 2.6132%. [US/] They didn't trade in Asia on Friday due to the holiday in Tokyo. This week has also been a volatile one for currencies. The dollar index, which tracks the greenback against six major peers fell 0.38% to 103.27 on Friday due to the improved risk sentiment, but was still not far from Thursday's high of 103.93 - its highest level since late 2022. The index's current monthly gain of 5% would be its best since 2015. On top of the safety-bid for the dollar, the rally has also been fed by market expectations for 150 basis points of rate hikes in just three Federal Reserve meetings. The aggressive Fed tightening path, mainly to curtail sky high inflation, far out paces other global central banks. The dollar's recent gains have been most significant against the yen, and it swept past the key psychological 130 yen level on Thursday, setting a fresh 20 year high. [FRX/] Weakness in China's yuan gathered pace on Friday, putting the currency on track for its biggest monthly drop since 1994, pressured by broad dollar strength and lockdowns in many major cities to curb the spread of COVID-19. Oil prices remained choppy as traders grappled with the supply issues stemming from the war in Ukraine as well as the demand impact of lockdowns in China. Brent crude rose 0.9% on Friday to 108.56 per barrel, U.S. crude rose 0.65% to $106.02. [O/R] Spot gold rose 0.65% to $1906.7 an ounce. [GOL/]

118 Replies 10 πŸ‘ 12 πŸ”₯

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
recently

By Shadia Nasralla (Reuters) -Oil prices dipped on Wednesday as a soaring dollar made barrels more expensive and Europe's biggest economy Germany was speeding up plans to wean itself off Russian oil while coronavirus outbreaks clouded China's economic outlook. Erasing earlier gains, Brent crude futures dipped 54 cents, or 0.5%, to $104.45 a barrel by 1259 GMT. U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude futures dropped 79 cents, or 0.8%, to $100.91 a barrel. Russian energy giant Gazprom (MCX:GAZP) said on Wednesday it halted gas supplies to Bulgaria and Poland in a major escalation of Russia's broader row with the West over Ukraine. European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said Russia was using fossil fuels to blackmail the EU but added the era of Russian fossil fuels in Europe was coming to an end. Germany is pushing ahead with attempts to become independent of Russian oil imports. German economy minister said plans to for Germany to take control of the PCK Schwedt refinery, majority-owned by Rosneft and the last big German buyer of Russian crude, were progressing. U.S. government data on oil inventories is due later on Wednesday. [EIA/S] Industry data on Tuesday showed U.S. crude and distillate stocks rose last week, while gasoline inventories fell. [API/S] Also capping oil price gains, the dollar rose to its highest in five years on Wednesday, making oil purchases more expensive for holders of other currencies. [FRX/] "A U.S. crude build last week and still solid Russian crude exports is limiting the upside for crude," said UBS commodity analyst Giovanni Stauvono. "This (is) a risk off environment with a stronger U.S. dollar and mobility restrictions in the second largest oil consumer, China." China's central bank said it would step up monetary policy support as Beijing races to stamp out a nascent COVID-19 outbreak in the capital and avert the same type of debilitating city-wide lockdown Shanghai has been under for a month. Any stimulus would boost oil demand. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) warned that Asia faced a "stagflationary" outlook. Still, China's domestic flight demand has rebounded, travel data firm OAG said.

123 Replies 8 πŸ‘ 9 πŸ”₯

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
recently

By Florence Tan (Reuters) -Oil prices extended gains on Wednesday amid simmering geopolitical tensions as Russia cut gas supplies to Bulgaria and Poland, while hopes of Chinese economic stimulus buoyed the demand outlook. Brent crude futures rose 67 cents, or 0.6%, to $105.66 a barrel by 0636 GMT. U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude futures gained 44 cents, or 0.4%, to $102.14 a barrel. Crude prices settled about 3% higher on Tuesday in volatile trade as the market is torn between supply and demand concerns over Russian oil and gas disruption and a worsening global economic outlook. "The market is increasingly volatile and event driven," said Howie Lee, an economist at Singapore's OCBC bank. "Energy security across the world is getting more vulnerable and vulnerable security normally comes with a higher price tag." Russian energy giant Gazprom (MCX:GAZP) said on Wednesday it has completely halted gas supplies to Bulgaria and Poland due to absence of payments from the countries in roubles for the fuel delivery, in a major escalation of Russia's broader row with the West over its invasion of Ukraine, which Moscow calls a "military operation". The row sent NYMEX ultra-low-sulfur diesel futures up more than 9% on Tuesday to settle at $4.47 a gallon, a record close. "Oil is supported via the escalation of geopolitical tensions," Stephen Innes of SPI Asset Management said in a note. "Cutting gas flows is not new news, but it's the timing of Russia plugging the gas flows when stagflationary fears are running rampant again." The International Monetary Fund (IMF) warned on Tuesday that Asia faces a "stagflationary" outlook with the Ukraine war, a spike in commodity costs and a slowdown in China creating significant uncertainty. China's central bank said on Tuesday it will step up prudent monetary policy support to its economy as Beijing races to stamp out a nascent COVID-19 outbreak in the capital and avert the same debilitating city-wide lockdown that has shrouded Shanghai for a month. Any stimulus would boost oil demand. Despite extended lockdowns in Asia's biggest aviation market, China's domestic flight demand has rebounded, pushing global airline capacity to its highest level in 2022 this week, travel data firm OAG said on Tuesday. In supply, U.S. government data on crude inventories is due later on Wednesday. Industry data on Tuesday showed U.S. crude and distillate stocks rose last week while gasoline inventories fell. [API/S] [EIA/S]

71 Replies 13 πŸ‘ 8 πŸ”₯

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@NoobBot #Crypto4Noobs
recently

Elon's Twitter: bluesky Keeps Independence, Dorsey Praises Musk, Market Awaits Next Step https://cryptonews.com/news/elons-twitter-bluesky-keeps-independence-dorsey-praises-musk-market-awaits-next-step.htm

43 Replies 11 πŸ‘ 13 πŸ”₯

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@mzx9 #droscrew
recently

@Navneet made me step back he's mater of earnings didn't give me anyfeedback

87 Replies 7 πŸ‘ 7 πŸ”₯

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@D2342 #droscrew
recently

I knew it was going to do that though but the options prices made me step back

96 Replies 8 πŸ‘ 6 πŸ”₯

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@NoobBot #Crypto4Noobs
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Ethereum DeFi Staple MakerDAO Adds StarkNet Bridge in First Step Toward Multi-Chain https://www.coindesk.com/tech/2022/04/20/ethereum-defi-staple-makerdao-adds-starknet-bridge-in-first-step-toward-multi-chain/?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=rss&utm_campaign=headlines

75 Replies 9 πŸ‘ 12 πŸ”₯

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@Benlax #droscrew
recently

STEP down near IPO is dumb cheap

48 Replies 8 πŸ‘ 8 πŸ”₯

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
recently

By Kevin Yao and Stella Qiu BEIJING (Reuters) - China's economy slowed in March as consumption, real estate and exports were hit hard, taking the shine off faster-than-expected first-quarter growth numbers and worsening an outlook already weakened by COVID-19 curbs and the Ukraine war. The biggest near-term challenge for Beijing is the tough new coronavirus rules at a time of heightened geopolitical risks, which have intensified supply and commodity cost pressures, leaving Chinese authorities walking a tight rope as they try to stimulate growth without endangering price stability. Gross domestic product (GDP) expanded by 4.8% in the first quarter from a year earlier, data from the National Bureau of Statistics showed on Monday, beating analysts' expectations for a 4.4% gain and picking up from 4.0% in the fourth quarter. A surprisingly strong start in the first two months of the year improved the headline figures, with GDP up 1.3% in January-March in quarter-on-quarter terms, compared with expectations for a 0.6% rise and a revised 1.5% gain in the previous quarter. Analysts say April data will likely be worse, with lockdowns in commercial centre Shanghai and elsewhere dragging on, prompting some to warn of rising recession risks. "Further impacts from lockdowns are imminent, not only because there has been a delay in the delivery of daily necessities, but also because they add uncertainty to services and factory operations that have already impacted the labour market," said Iris Pang, Greater China chief economist at ING. "We may need to revise our GDP forecasts further if fiscal support does not come in time." China's shares fell, likely reacting to the March numbers and a weak outlook - the blue chip CSI300 index was down 0.6%, while the Shanghai Composite Index dropped 0.5%. WORSENING RETAIL SALES, JOBLESS RATE Data on March activity showed retail sales contracting the most on an annual basis since April 2020 on widespread COVID curbs across the country. They fell 3.5%, worse than expectations for a 1.6% decrease and an increase of 6.7% in January-February. The job market is already showing signs of stress in March, a usually robust month for labour market as factories resume hiring after the Lunar New Year holiday. China's nationwide survey-based jobless rate stood at 5.8% in March, the highest since May 2020, while that in 31 major cities hit a record 6.0%. The industrial sector held up better with production expanding 5.0% from a year earlier, compared with forecasts for a 4.5% gain. That was down from a 7.5% increase in the first two months of the year. Fixed asset investment, a driver of growth that Beijing is counting on to underpin the economy, increased 9.3% year-on-year in the first quarter, compared with an expected 8.5% increase but down from 12.2% growth in the first two months. Analysts at Capital Economics and Nomura believe the official GDP figures may have understated the slowdown last quarter. Capital Economics says growth in services production index for Q1 does not align with the expansion of the services sector in the GDP data, while Nomura said some of the March data, such as industrial production, are hard to reconcile with many other indicators of industrial activity. Home sales by value in March slumped 26.2% year-on-year, the biggest drop since January-February 2020, according to Reuters calculations, pointing to a deepening downturn in the property market. 'HIGHLY COSTLY' COVID-19 CURBS The government's determination to stop the spread of record COVID-19 cases has clogged highways and ports, stranded workers and shut factories - disruptions that are rippling through global supply chains for goods from electric vehicles to iPhones. The contribution from net exports to GDP growth fell to 3.7% in the first quarter from 26.4% in the fourth as momentum ebbed. Fu Linghui, a NBS spokesman, acknowledged the increase in downward economic pressure. "We will step up the implementation of macro policies, make every effort to stabilise the economic fundamentals, and strive to achieve the targets and tasks for the year," Fu told a news conference. The People's Bank of China (PBOC) said on Monday it would step up support for industries, firms and people hit by COVID-19 in its latest move to cushion them from the impact of economic slowdown. Late on Friday, the PBOC said it would cut the amount of cash that banks must hold as reserves for the first time this year, releasing about 530 billion yuan ($83.25 billion) in long-term liquidity, although the reduction missed expectations. Analysts see less room for more China rate cuts, after the smaller-than-expected RRR reduction, which they say reflected the PBOC's concern about inflation and U.S. monetary tightening. "The government faces a dilemma: how to balance economic growth and containing the outbreaks. Locking down large cities like Shanghai is highly costly," said Zhiwei Zhang, chief economist at Pinpoint Asset Management. "Such costs will become more visible in coming months."

109 Replies 10 πŸ‘ 7 πŸ”₯

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@ivtrades-Chris #ivtrades
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(3) The S&P has some support around 4330-4335 so we could see some buyers step in around there if the breadth happens to get oversold. We will see how it plays out. (4) I suffered a bloody nose on that $APPL trade last week as it failed to follow through to the upside after the range expansion day. Will need to make that up this week if possible.

55 Replies 9 πŸ‘ 10 πŸ”₯

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
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By Stella Qiu and Kevin Yao BEIJING (Reuters) -China said on Friday it would cut the amount of cash that banks must hold as reserves for the first time this year, releasing about 530 billion yuan ($83.25 billion) in long-term liquidity to cushion a sharp slowdown in economic growth. The People's Bank of China (PBOC) said on its website it would cut the reserve requirement ratio (RRR) for all banks by 25 basis points (bps), effective from April 25, but analysts said it might not yet be enough to reverse the slowdown. Heightened global risks from the war in Ukraine and within China widespread COVID-19 lockdowns and a weak property market have triggered convulsions in the world's second-largest economy that are quickly spilling over into global supply chains. China's exports, the last major driver of growth, are also showing signs of fatigue, and some economists say the risks of a recession are rising. "I don’t think this RRR cut matters that much for the economy at this stage," said Zhiwei Zhang, chief economist at Pinpoint Asset Management, noting it was less than markets had expected. "The main challenge the economy faces is the Omicron outbreaks and the lockdown policies that restrict mobility. More liquidity may help on the margin, but it doesn’t address the root of the problem," he said. The PBOC said the latest RRR cut would boost the long-term funds for banks, enabling them to step up support for industries and firms affected by COVID-19 outbreaks, and lower costs for banks. It will cut financial institutions' annual funding costs by about 6.5 billion yuan. The PBOC will also continue to keep liquidity broadly stable, while closely watching inflationary trends and policy changes made by developed countries, it said. For city commercial banks that do not have cross-provincial business and rural commercial banks that have an RRR of more than 5%, they are entitled to an additional cut of 25 bps. The weighted average RRR for financial institutions will be lowered to 8.1% after the cut, the central bank said. Ting Lu, chief China economist at Nomura, expects another 25bp RRR cut before the year-end, most likely before mid-2022, before cutting RRR for some big banks that still have relatively high reserve ratios. "We expect the PBOC to focus on increasing its direct credit support to small- and medium-sized enterprises, the agricultural sector, green investment, tech and elderly care via the MLF (medium-term lending facility), relending and rediscounting channels," Lu said. HEADWINDS The cut, which follows a broad-based reduction in December, had been widely expected after China's cabinet said on Wednesday that monetary policy tools should be used in a timely way to bolster growth. The PBOC has also started cutting interest rates, while local governments have expedited infrastructure spending and the finance ministry has pledged more tax cuts. China's economy rebounded strongly from a pandemic-induced slump in 2020 but cooled over the course of 2021 due to persistent property market weakness and strict measures to contain COVID-19 flare-ups, which hurt consumption. The government's determination to halt the latest spread of record COVID-19 cases has clogged highways and ports, stranded workers and shut countless factories - disruptions that are ripping through global supply chains for goods ranging from electric vehicles to iPhones. China's imports unexpectedly fell in March as the restrictions hampered freight arrivals and weakened domestic demand, while export growth also slowed. Factory and services sector activity both contracted. The government is targeting economic growth of around 5.5% this year as headwinds build, but some analysts say that may now be hard to achieve without more aggressive stimulus measures. With other major central banks such as the U.S. Federal Reserve set to aggressively raise interest rates or already doing so, more forceful easing in China could spur potentially destabilising capital outflows as investors shift money to higher yielding assets. Earlier on Friday, the PBOC kept the rate on its medium-term lending facility unchanged for a third straight month, as expected.

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@dros #droscrew
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would love to see Chipotle step up

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@Mago.del.Borneo #decarolis
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La correzione attesa con Gann a inizio aprile Γ¨ arrivata ad un primo step.... questa settimana Γ¨ sdi setup su molti indici quindi si potrebbe ospitare un primo target ribassista

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@D2342 #droscrew
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Snow going to 130 but it's gonna be a step by step thing.

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
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By Wayne Cole SYDNEY (Reuters) - Share markets made cautious gains on Monday amid talk of more sanctions against Russia over its invasion of Ukraine, while bonds screamed the risk of a hard landing for the U.S. economy as short-term yields hit three-year highs. A holiday in China made for sluggish trading, and MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan inched up 0.6%. Japan's Nikkei added 0.1%, while S&P 500 stock futures and Nasdaq futures were flat. EUROSTOXX 50 futures firmed 0.2% and FTSE futures 0.4%. While Russia-Ukraine peace talks dragged on, reports of Russian atrocities led Germany to say the West would agree to impose more sanctions in coming days. Germany's defence minister also said the European Union must discuss banning imports of Russian gas, a step that would most likely send prices yet higher while forcing energy rationing in Europe. Data last week showed inflation in the EU had already surged to a record high, piling pressure on the European Central Bank to rein in prices even as growth slows sharply. "It really looks like it is time for the ECB to act," warned analysts at ANZ in a note. "While the ECB will be cautious about raising rates, it certainly looks like it should act sooner to abolish its QE programme." The U.S. Federal Reserve has already raised rates and is predicted to do a lot more after Friday's solid March payrolls report. Several Fed officials are due to speak at public events this week, with the prospect of sending more hawkish signals, and minutes of the last policy meeting are due on Wednesday. "We now expect the Fed to hike by 50bps in May, June, and July, before dialling the pace back slightly by delivering 25bps hikes at the September, November and December," said Kevin Cummins (NYSE:CMI) chief U.S. economist at NatWest Markets. "This will bring the funds rate into restrictive territory sooner, with 2.50-2.75% by year-end 2022." Investors reacted by hammering short-dated Treasuries and further inverting the yield curve as the market priced in the risk all this tightening would ultimately lead to recession. On Monday, two-year yields were up at three-year highs of 2.49% and well above the 10-year at 2.410%. The jump in yields has underpinned the U.S. dollar, particularly against the yen, given the Bank of Japan acted repeatedly last week to keep its bond yields near zero. The dollar was trading firm at 122.60 yen and not far from its recent seven-year peak of 125.10. The euro drifted to $1.1045 and could fall further should the EU actually act to stop gas flows from Russia, which calls its actions in Ukraine a "special operation". The dollar index was last at 98.617, having recently bounced around between 97.681 and 99.377. The rise in bond yields globally has been a drag on gold, which pays no return, and the metal was stuck at $1,920 an ounce. [GOL/] Meanwhile oil prices took an early knock after the United Arab Emirates and the Iran-aligned Houthi group welcomed a truce that would halt military operations on the Saudi-Yemeni border, alleviating some concerns about potential supply issues. [O/R] Oil slid 13% last week - the biggest weekly fall in two years - after U.S. President Joe Biden announced the largest-ever U.S. oil reserves release. Price stabilised as the day wore on and Brent edged up 32 cents to $104.71, while U.S. crude added 22 cents to $99.49. [O/R]

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@Chano #StockTraders.NET
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just one baby step above paper trading

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@NoobBot #Crypto4Noobs
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Analysts debate Bitcoin’s next step after today’s $45.5K retest https://cointelegraph.com/news/analysts-debate-bitcoin-s-next-step-after-today-s-45-5k-retest

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@NoobBot #Crypto4Noobs
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**@CNBC:** This 3-step strategy is the best way to quit your job, according to career experts. (via @CNBCMakeIt) https://t.co/kGmneCT9UP https://twitter.com/CNBC/status/1509254745642487808

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@Chano #StockTraders.NET
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both my pnl and my step count are poor ☠️

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@NoobBot #Crypto4Noobs
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**@IBDinvestors:** Follow a simple three-step routine to zero in on the best potential stock picks. https://t.co/lrXP4jG048 https://twitter.com/IBDinvestors/status/1509218979570716676

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@NoobBot #Crypto4Noobs
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**@nytimesbusiness:** Germany activated the first step of a national gas emergency plan that could, eventually, lead to rationing of natural gas, as the country’s economy minister pointed to growing concerns that Russia could cut off deliveries. https://t.co/Rdgxtitt2O https://twitter.com/nytimesbusiness/status/1509140910717681670

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
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By Alun John HONG KONG (Reuters) - Asia shares joined a global rally on Wednesday as hopes rose for a negotiated end to the Ukraine conflict, while bond markets signalled concern about the U.S. economy overnight after 10-year yields briefly dipped below two year rates. MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan rose 1.28% to its highest level in nearly a month, with most Asian stock markets in positive territory, and Chinese blue chips, up 2.5%, leading the charge. Japan's Nikkei bucked the trend however, falling 1%, as observers pointed to profit taking heading into the end of the fiscal year. The benchmark hit a two-month closing high on Tuesday. (T) Ukraine, on Tuesday, proposed adopting a neutral status in a sign of progress at face-to-face negotiations, though on the ground, reports of attacks continued, and Ukraine reacted with skepticism to Russia's promise in negotiations to scale down military operations around Kyiv. The rally looked set to peter out later in the day however, as while U.S. and European shares had risen sharply overnight, futures pointed to a lower open on Wednesday. EUROSTOXX 50 futures shed 0.18%, FTSE futures and U.S. S&P 500 futures were flat. "On the one hand there has been more positive news regarding Ukraine, and the market is hopeful of a peace deal at some point, which is resulting in a bit of a 'risk-on' event, with shares up," said Shane Oliver chief economist and head of investment strategy at AMP (OTC:AMLTF) Capital. "But then it's back to worrying about inflation and bond yields, and there's this debate about whether we're going to see a recession in the U.S. because of the inversion of part of the U.S. yield curve." The widely tracked U.S. 2-year/10-year Treasury yield curve briefly inverted on Tuesday for the first time since September 2019, as bond investors bet that aggressive tightening by the Federal Reserve could hurt the U.S. economy over the longer term. [US/] Longer-dated yields falling below shorter ones indicate a lack of faith in future growth, and 10-year yields falling beneath 2-year rates is widely seen as a harbinger of recession. On the other hand, the spread between the yield on 3-month Treasury bills and 10-year notes this month remained steeper. "The messages from the yield curve are very confusing," said Oliver. The benchmark U.S. 10-year yield was last softer at 2.3615% having risen as high as 2.557% on Monday, its highest since April 2019, as traders position themselves for quickfire rate hikes by the U.S. Federal Reserve. The spread between the U.S. 10-year and 2-year yields was last 3.4 basis points. JAPAN IN FOCUS Rising U.S. yields are also dragging Japanese government bond yields in their wake, a threat to Japan's ultra loose monetary policy. The Bank of Japan increased its efforts to defend its key yield cap on Wednesday offering to ramp up buying of government bonds across the curve including through unscheduled emergency market operations. While this apparently underscored its resolve to hold to the policy, some analysts questioned whether the strategy was sustainable. β€œI wouldn’t be surprised if the Bank of Japan sets a higher limit for 10 year JBG yields – currently at 0.25%. They can’t afford to be too far behind the curve, because if the yen were to weaken further beyond certain levels it could raise market fears,” said JoΓ«l Le Saux fund manager of Eurizon Fund's Sustainable Japan Equity sub fund. The widening differential between U.S. and Japanese yields have caused the yen to weaken sharply, but it managed to regain some lost ground on Wednesday. The Japanese currency was was at 121.95 per dollar, compared to from Monday's low of 124.3. Traders pointed to rising fears that Japanese authorities might step in to try and halt the slide as being behind the recovery. [FRX/] Elsewhere in currency markets, the euro was up 0.2% at $1.1107 supported by hopes that talks between Russia and Ukraine lead to peace. Supply tightness kept crude prices firm, according to analysts, as the oil market was not ready to speculate that the talks would end the conflict and pave the way for Western allies to remove sanctions against Russian oil exports. Brent crude rose 0.66% to $110.96 per barrel. U.S. crude rose 0.7% to $104.97. [O/R] Spot gold rose 0.3% to $1920.6 per ounce. [GOL/]

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@Mago.del.Borneo #decarolis
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intanto come indice primo step a 25000 raggiunto

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
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By Yuka Obayashi TOKYO (Reuters) - Oil prices tumbled more than $5 on Monday as fears over weaker fuel demand in China grew after financial hub Shanghai launched a two-stage lockdown to contain a surge in COVID-19 infections. The market kicked off another week of uncertainty, buffeted on one side by the war between Ukraine and Russia, the world's second-largest crude exporter, and expansion of COVID-related lockdowns in China, the largest crude importer globally. Brent crude futures slid as low as $115.32 a barrel and were trading down $5.15, or 4.3%, at $115.50 at 0731 GMT. U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures hit a low of $108.28 a barrel, and were down $5.30, or 4.7%, at $108.60. Both benchmark contracts rose 1.4% on Friday, notching their first weekly gains in three weeks, with Brent surging 11.8% and WTI climbing 8.8%. "Shanghai's lockdown prompted a fresh sell-off from disappointed investors as they expected such a lockdown would be avoided," said Kazuhiko Saito, chief analyst at Fujitomi Securities. Shanghai launched a two-stage lockdown of the city of 26 million people on Monday, closing bridges and tunnels, and restricting highway traffic to contain surging local COVID-19 cases. Saito also said the bullish reaction to a missile attack by Yemen's Houthis on a Saudi oil distribution facility had ran its course on Friday. But he expected the oil market to turn bullish when the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and allies, known as OPEC+, meet on Thursday, as the group was "less likely to raise oil output at a faster pace than in recent months". Analysts have varying estimates of how hard Russian oil exports could be hit by economic sanctions imposed on Moscow by the United States and its allies following Russia's invasion of Ukraine. Some reckon that 1 million to 3 million barrels per day (bpd) of Russian oil might not make it to the market. Russia, which calls its actions in Ukraine a "special operation", exported 4.7 million bpd of crude in 2021, making it the world's second-largest exporter behind Saudi Arabia. OPEC+ has so far resisted calls from major consuming nations to step up an output boost. The group has been raising output by 400,000 bpd each month since August to unwind cuts made when the COVID-19 pandemic hit demand. "Oil prices will likely stay above $100 a barrel for a while as global supply will only get tighter as supply from Russia declines while the United States is headed to driving season," said Tetsu Emori, chief executive of Emori Fund Management. OECD stockpiles are at their lowest since 2014. To help ease tight supply, the United States is considering another release of oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) that could be bigger than the sale of 30 million barrels earlier this month, a source said. "But given the already low inventories, there will be limited release of SPR, which is seen as another supporting factor to the market," Emori said. U.S. drillers added oil rigs for a 19th consecutive month but at the slowest pace since 2020 even though the government urged producers to boost output.

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@Salem #Emporos Research
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nice. what's the next step down? I see 42 maybe

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@NoobBot #Crypto4Noobs
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Marc Andreessen may step down from Meta board due to crypto empire: Reports https://cointelegraph.com/news/marc-andreessen-may-step-down-from-meta-board-due-to-crypto-empire-reports

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
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By Eileen Soreng and Praveen Menon (Reuters) - Russia might look to its giant neighbour to replace Australian alumina supplies cut off by sanctions, but Chinese aluminium smelters need all the feedstock they can get and may be worried about secondary sanctions from the West, industry analysts say. Australia on Sunday imposed an immediate ban on exports to Russia of alumina and aluminium ores, including bauxite, in response to Moscow's invasion of Ukraine. The move squeezes Russian aluminium giant Rusal, the world's No.2 producer outside China. It gets about 19% of its alumina from Australia's Queensland Aluminium (QAL), in which it holds a 20% stake. Graphic: Australia's ban on alumina exports to Russia tightens the raw materials screw on Rusal: https://fingfx.thomsonreuters.com/gfx/ While there is no concrete evidence that Russia is seeking Chinese alumina supplies, analysts say close ties, proximity and the size of the Chinese market make it a logical option. China, the top global aluminium producer, is likely to step in and absorb Australian alumina exports that had previously headed to Russia and could then potentially on-sell supplies, said Wood Mackenzie senior manager Uday Patel. "Chinese firms could buy alumina from QAL and then sell back to Rusal," Patel told Reuters. "(China) could also sell some of its domestic production, but note that alumina demand in China is also increasing this year as Chinese smelters lift output after all the power constraint issues in 2021." QAL and Anglo-Australian mining giant Rio Tinto (NYSE:RIO), which owns 80%, did not respond to requests for comment about what would happen to the alumina exports meant for Russia and if they were receiving requests from Chinese companies. Rusal could not be reached for comment but said previously it was evaluating the effects of the Australian move. ANZ analyst Soni Kumari agreed China's domestic demand would constrain what it can do for Russia. "Russia could turn to China, but the country does not have enough export surplus given their requirement to feed domestic smelters," she said. "Further, Chinese exporters would be cautious too due to fear of secondary sanctions." Washington has warned China against taking advantage of business opportunities created by sanctions and helping Moscow evade export controls or process its banned financial transactions. Kazakhstan could step up to help offset Russian shortages, Kumari said, while other suppliers could include Brazil, Jamaica and Guinea. 'PARIAH STATE' China has refused to condemn Russia's action in Ukraine or call it an invasion. Beijing has also opposed economic sanctions on Russia, which it says are unilateral and are not authorised by the U.N. Security Council. "Russia is its key ally but at the same time China doesn't want the stigma of being seen as a pariah state for helping Russia," said Patel. He said there was talk in the market of some tonnages of alumina booked to be shipped from China to Russia via eastern Russian ports. Reuters could not independently verify any additional alumina shipments or planned shipments to Russia from China. China exported 7,967 tonnes of alumina in the first two months of this year of which 698.6 tonnes went to Russia, according to Chinese customs data. Last year, its alumina exports were at 119,891 tonnes, with 1,822 tonnes going to Russia. The loss of Australian supplies is not the only issue for Rusal, which supplies about 6% of global aluminium. Among Rusal's other major alumina suppliers, the Nikolaev refinery in Ukraine with a capacity of 1.75 million tonnes a year, is out of commission because of the conflict. There are also supply chain issues at Rusal's 2 million tonnes a year Aughinish alumina refinery in Ireland, WoodMac said. European nations and the United States have imposed heavy sanctions on Russia since Moscow sent troops into Ukraine on Feb 24 in what it calls a "special military operation". The sanctions and ongoing conflict, along with supply constraints caused by the pandemic, have pressured commodities markets and triggered record price hikes. [MET/L] Aluminium is a key metal due to its use across sectors from auto, aerospace, packaging, machinery and construction sectors to production of military equipment and ammunition. " onerror="this.style.display='none'" class="msg-img" />

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@marketjay #marketassasins
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The Goal: Stay Alive, The Why: Our 5 step Recession trade. Oil was phase 1. Phase 2 is occurring now

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@trademaster #TradeHouses
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Stocks step back, oil bounces as peace talks stall

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@NoobBot #Crypto4Noobs
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NCA wants regulation for coin mixers, but the crypto industry is already one step ahead https://cointelegraph.com/news/nca-wants-regulation-for-coin-mixers-but-the-crypto-industry-is-already-one-step-ahead

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@NoobBot #Crypto4Noobs
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EU's Sweeping Crypto Regulations Package One Step Closer to Ratification https://www.coindesk.com/policy/2022/03/14/eus-sweeping-crypto-regulations-package-one-step-closer-to-ratification/?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=rss&utm_campaign=headlines

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Key Metrics

Market Cap

1.68 B

Beta

1.50

Avg. Volume

283.85 K

Shares Outstanding

60.79 M

Yield

1.59%

Public Float

0

Next Earnings Date

Next Dividend Date

Company Information

StepStone Group is a global private markets investment firm focused on providing customized investment solutions and advisory and data services to its clients. The Company partner with its clients to develop and build private markets portfolios designed to meet their specific objectives across private equity, infrastructure, private debt and real estate asset classes.

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